Tuesday, November 29, 2016

The new, simpler Tutorial proposal form closes tomorrow!

This is the time of year when the upcoming PyCon really starts to feel closer, with the close of our earliest CFP (Call for Proposals) tomorrow on November 30. This is the first of several milestones for the conference that start arriving more and more frequently through the late autumn and winter. Each milestone ratchets PyCon one step closer to its arrival.

Our earliest CFP is for our Tutorials, which closes tomorrow — at the end of the day on November 30 anywhere on Earth. So if it is still November 30 in your time zone, then the CFP will not yet be closed!

IMG_0794.jpg

What are the main features of Tutorials?

  • Tutorials are 3-hour-long courses that pack the first two days of the PyCon conference schedule.
  • Students register ahead of time and pay separately for each 3-hour tutorial they attend.
  • We end the Tutorials CFP a full month earlier than for Talks and Posters, so the tutorials committee has extra time to fully vet each proposal and to generate a solid line-up of valuable topics that will repay the students’ investment to attend them.
  • In return for providing this value to the conference, we compensate each instructor. The amount can vary each year depending on the conference budget, but in 2016 we were able to reward them each with $1,500 for the instruction they provided our attendees.
  • You can learn more at our Proposing a Tutorial page, which includes links to long lists of topics in case you need inspiration!

If you proposed a tutorial last year, you will be happy to learn that we have streamlined the form to only four fields beyond the title itself:

  1. The Description is the public advertisement for your Tutorial and will be visible on the PyCon web site — replacing what used to be separate Description and Abstract fields. The other fields below are private and shared only with the committee.
  2. The Audience field lets you write a free-form description of who you think will be interested in and benefit from your tutorial. It replaces the old Audience, Category, and Perceived Value fields.
  3. The most detailed information, as before, belongs in the Outline that you write up for the committee.
  4. Finally, the Additional notes let you describe your previous experience as an instructor and mention any special setup or materials that your tutorial will require. It replaces the old fields Additional Notes, Additional Requirements, More Info, and Handout.

Hopefully the new form means that you spend less time puzzling over what the difference between a Description and an Abstract is, and more time focusing on your ideas about your course!

Does teaching at PyCon interest you? There is only one day left to submit your proposal! Head on over to the Proposing a Tutorial page and get your idea submitted before the end of the day on November 30 anywhere on Earth.

Wednesday, November 09, 2016

Tutorial proposals are due in three weeks

The PyCon 2017 call for proposals (CFP) first opened about a month ago, and the team who will be bringing the conference to Portland have been excited to watch the first wave of submissions roll in. Exciting topics from across the PyCon community have already been proposed for our talks, tutorials, and poster schedules.

But we know that many of you are brimming with ideas that you have not yet submitted, so we wanted to remind you of this year’s deadlines:

  • Talk proposals will be due on 2017 January 3.
  • Poster proposals will be due on 2017 January 3.
  • Tutorial proposals are due on 2017 November 30.

Yes, that’s right — tutorial proposals are due in three weeks!

Last year we explained the one-month difference between the talk and tutorial deadlines in a detailed blog post that we invite you to review this year if you want to understand why the Tutorial review process takes more time for its committee. Entrusted with the one PyCon schedule for which attendees pay an individual fee per course, the Tutorial Committee takes extra time to make sure that courses are going to live up to the conference’s high reputation. As the Tutorials Chair, Ruben Orduz, reminded us last year:

“It’s a very time-consuming process, but it helps in selecting the best lineup while making sure every tutorial that had potential was given a fair chance. Compressing the timeline would mean only selecting from the top well-known proposers and forgetting the rest. That would be against our philosophy of giving chances to new instructors and increasing diversity.”

So we hope those of you with dreams of offering a tutorial will find the time within the next two weeks to get your proposal written up and submitted. Just visit our “Proposing a Tutorial” page for a guide to writing up your idea and getting it submitted — before November 30, when our Tutorials CFP will close once it is midnight and the day is over in every time zone. Good luck!

Monday, November 07, 2016

Registration is open for PyCon 2017!

This year our conference registrar is happy to offer a sleek and more modern interface for registering and getting your hotel room for PyCon 2017 in Portland, Oregon! There were a few technical kinks involved so we took the process slowly. We started with a soft launch to iron out any problems, and are now ready for everyone to sign up!

PyCon has now sold out 5 years running, and we expect it to sell out again this year. Portland proved to be a wonderful venue for the conference, and we look forward to our upcoming return there for a second and final year. Remember that the first 800 tickets sold receive our Early Bird discount, and that they are likely to sell fast.

We have also opened our Financial Assistance application. It stays open until 15 February — so speakers will have time to apply after we announce the program schedule — but please feel free to go ahead and sign up now if you know that attending PyCon will present you with financial difficulty.

Here are the links:

Registration Information
Registration Form
Financial Assistance

PyCon 2017 is more than a week of events! Two days of tutorials offer classroom-style instruction, the three main weekend conference days are packed with talks and open spaces and events, and then the conference finishes with four full days of sprints where volunteers work together on open source projects. More than 3,000 fans and contributors to Python are expected to attend!

Both breakfast and lunch are included in the price of registration, along with refreshments and coffee breaks.

Note that tutorials are not covered in the price of a normal registration. Instead, each 3-hour tutorial class costs $150, and you can attend up to four classes if you book both a morning and an afternoon class during the two tutorial days. We will open tutorial sign-ups once the tutorial schedule is announced next year!