Tuesday, November 29, 2016

The new, simpler Tutorial proposal form closes tomorrow!

This is the time of year when the upcoming PyCon really starts to feel closer, with the close of our earliest CFP (Call for Proposals) tomorrow on November 30. This is the first of several milestones for the conference that start arriving more and more frequently through the late autumn and winter. Each milestone ratchets PyCon one step closer to its arrival.

Our earliest CFP is for our Tutorials, which closes tomorrow — at the end of the day on November 30 anywhere on Earth. So if it is still November 30 in your time zone, then the CFP will not yet be closed!

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What are the main features of Tutorials?

  • Tutorials are 3-hour-long courses that pack the first two days of the PyCon conference schedule.
  • Students register ahead of time and pay separately for each 3-hour tutorial they attend.
  • We end the Tutorials CFP a full month earlier than for Talks and Posters, so the tutorials committee has extra time to fully vet each proposal and to generate a solid line-up of valuable topics that will repay the students’ investment to attend them.
  • In return for providing this value to the conference, we compensate each instructor. The amount can vary each year depending on the conference budget, but in 2016 we were able to reward them each with $1,500 for the instruction they provided our attendees.
  • You can learn more at our Proposing a Tutorial page, which includes links to long lists of topics in case you need inspiration!

If you proposed a tutorial last year, you will be happy to learn that we have streamlined the form to only four fields beyond the title itself:

  1. The Description is the public advertisement for your Tutorial and will be visible on the PyCon web site — replacing what used to be separate Description and Abstract fields. The other fields below are private and shared only with the committee.
  2. The Audience field lets you write a free-form description of who you think will be interested in and benefit from your tutorial. It replaces the old Audience, Category, and Perceived Value fields.
  3. The most detailed information, as before, belongs in the Outline that you write up for the committee.
  4. Finally, the Additional notes let you describe your previous experience as an instructor and mention any special setup or materials that your tutorial will require. It replaces the old fields Additional Notes, Additional Requirements, More Info, and Handout.

Hopefully the new form means that you spend less time puzzling over what the difference between a Description and an Abstract is, and more time focusing on your ideas about your course!

Does teaching at PyCon interest you? There is only one day left to submit your proposal! Head on over to the Proposing a Tutorial page and get your idea submitted before the end of the day on November 30 anywhere on Earth.

Wednesday, November 09, 2016

Tutorial proposals are due in three weeks

The PyCon 2017 call for proposals (CFP) first opened about a month ago, and the team who will be bringing the conference to Portland have been excited to watch the first wave of submissions roll in. Exciting topics from across the PyCon community have already been proposed for our talks, tutorials, and poster schedules.

But we know that many of you are brimming with ideas that you have not yet submitted, so we wanted to remind you of this year’s deadlines:

  • Talk proposals will be due on 2017 January 3.
  • Poster proposals will be due on 2017 January 3.
  • Tutorial proposals are due on 2017 November 30.

Yes, that’s right — tutorial proposals are due in three weeks!

Last year we explained the one-month difference between the talk and tutorial deadlines in a detailed blog post that we invite you to review this year if you want to understand why the Tutorial review process takes more time for its committee. Entrusted with the one PyCon schedule for which attendees pay an individual fee per course, the Tutorial Committee takes extra time to make sure that courses are going to live up to the conference’s high reputation. As the Tutorials Chair, Ruben Orduz, reminded us last year:

“It’s a very time-consuming process, but it helps in selecting the best lineup while making sure every tutorial that had potential was given a fair chance. Compressing the timeline would mean only selecting from the top well-known proposers and forgetting the rest. That would be against our philosophy of giving chances to new instructors and increasing diversity.”

So we hope those of you with dreams of offering a tutorial will find the time within the next two weeks to get your proposal written up and submitted. Just visit our “Proposing a Tutorial” page for a guide to writing up your idea and getting it submitted — before November 30, when our Tutorials CFP will close once it is midnight and the day is over in every time zone. Good luck!

Monday, November 07, 2016

Registration is open for PyCon 2017!

This year our conference registrar is happy to offer a sleek and more modern interface for registering and getting your hotel room for PyCon 2017 in Portland, Oregon! There were a few technical kinks involved so we took the process slowly. We started with a soft launch to iron out any problems, and are now ready for everyone to sign up!

PyCon has now sold out 5 years running, and we expect it to sell out again this year. Portland proved to be a wonderful venue for the conference, and we look forward to our upcoming return there for a second and final year. Remember that the first 800 tickets sold receive our Early Bird discount, and that they are likely to sell fast.

We have also opened our Financial Assistance application. It stays open until 15 February — so speakers will have time to apply after we announce the program schedule — but please feel free to go ahead and sign up now if you know that attending PyCon will present you with financial difficulty.

Here are the links:

Registration Information
Registration Form
Financial Assistance

PyCon 2017 is more than a week of events! Two days of tutorials offer classroom-style instruction, the three main weekend conference days are packed with talks and open spaces and events, and then the conference finishes with four full days of sprints where volunteers work together on open source projects. More than 3,000 fans and contributors to Python are expected to attend!

Both breakfast and lunch are included in the price of registration, along with refreshments and coffee breaks.

Note that tutorials are not covered in the price of a normal registration. Instead, each 3-hour tutorial class costs $150, and you can attend up to four classes if you book both a morning and an afternoon class during the two tutorial days. We will open tutorial sign-ups once the tutorial schedule is announced next year!

Sunday, October 09, 2016

The PyCon 2017 site has launched — thank you to our Launch Day Sponsors

The new PyCon 2017 web site recently went live, and the conference volunteers have worked hard bring the new site up-to-date with all of the essential details about 2017’s schedule, venue, and hotels. We are very happy with the new logo and banner that Beatrix Bodó crafted to help the conference celebrate its second and final year in beautiful Portland, Oregon!

With the release of the site we have also opened up the proposal forms for Talks, Tutorials, Posters, and Education Summit presentations. Visit our “Speak at PyCon” page to read the details of our Call For Proposals (CFP) and to learn about becoming part of the 2017 conference schedule.

Our launch-day sponsors this year — the organizations who have gone ahead and pledged to support and attend PyCon 2017, helping keep the conference affordable for as wide a range of attendees as possible — are from a broad array of fields that illustrate just how widely Python is used in today’s world.

Two of our Launch Day sponsors this year are supporting the conference at the Platinum level:

  • Platinum sponsor Microsoft “is proud to support the Python community through sponsored development of Python Tools for Visual Studio, Jupyter, CPython, Azure Machine Learning and organizations such as the PSF and NumFocus.” Millions of programmers around the world find themselves with support for Python already sitting on their desktop because their team or workplace uses Visual Studio.
  • Platinum sponsor Anaconda from Contiuum Analytics “is the leading Open Data Science platform powered by Python.” Any of you who, like me, now use Anaconda as your go-to method for installing Python — and all the best data science libraries — will appreciate how crucial the tool has become to our community’s ability to get new users up and running quickly.

Our launch-day Gold sponsors range from large Fortune 100 companies to small consultancies providing boutique consulting and programming:

  • Wingware — An IDE designed specifically for Python.
  • Stormpath — An identity management API for software teams.
  • Sentry — Real-time error tracking for your web apps, mobile apps, and games.
  • Nylas — A new platform for email-powered apps.
  • Lincoln Loop — A full-service software development agency specializing in Python and Django.
  • Leadpages — Helps businesses grow by collecting more leads and driving more sales.
  • Fusionbox — A custom software development agency specializing in Python/Django, ETL, and application security.
  • Demonware — The online services behind some of the world’s most popular game franchises.
  • Capital One — A Fortune 100 Company with the levels of innovation and agility that you’d typically find at a start-up.
  • Caktus Group — Django web application development done right.
  • American Greetings — A leading creator and manufacturer of innovative social expression products.

And, finally, we have already signed our first Silver sponsor!

  • O'Reilly — The media company that first put open source on the map for many programmers, providing shelves of books and references to help orient them to a world of operating systems and tools that they had not known existed.

For more details about each sponsor, see the detailed sponsor descriptions on our Sponsors Page and follow the links to their web sites. We look forward to seeing every one of these sponsors in the Expo Hall on Friday and Saturday of the main conference!

Subscribe to our blog here for regular updates as the conference approaches. To get you started, here are the most important dates for the conference through the rest of the year and up to PyCon itself:

2016

  • October 3 — Call For Proposals (CFP) for Talks, Tutorials, Posters, and the Education Summit
  • October 14 — Financial Assistance application opens
  • October 17 — Registration opens
  • November 30Tutorial proposals due

2017

  • January 3Talk, Poster, and Education Summit proposals due
  • February 1–12 — Talks, Tutorials, Posters, and Education Summit schedules announced
  • February 15Financial Assistance applications due
  • March 3 — Financial Assistance grants awarded
  • March 30 — Deadline to respond to Financial Assistance offer

In Portland, Oregon

  • May 17–18 — Two days of Tutorials
  • May 19–21 — Three main conference days including Talks, Expo Hall, Job Fair, and Posters
  • May 22–25 — Four days of Sprints

Saturday, June 11, 2016

PyCon JP 2016 Call for Proposals

PyCon JP is a conference where Python users, or people interested in Python, gather to learn from each other and meet other members of the community.
We will hold PyCon Japan on September 20-24 this year in Tokyo and are looking for talk proposals.
We are pleased to invite the Pythonista to submit your proposal to PyCon JP 2016.

Important Dates for Proposal Submissions
  • Submission deadline: 2016 June 13(Mon)
  • Author notification: 2016 June late
Proposal Submission process
  1. Register an account at the site of PyCon JP 2016
  2. Register the speaker profile
  3. To submit a new proposal
Click https://pycon.jp/2016/en/account/login/ to submit Proposal

Best regards and hope to see you at PyCon JP 2016

Sunday, May 29, 2016

How to get ready for the PyCon development sprints

[A guest post by Kushal Das, one of the 2016 Sprint Coordinators]

So — you have already decided to join in the PyCon development sprints! The sprints run for four days, from Thursday to Sunday after the conference. You do not have to be registered for the conference to attend the sprints! Some teams plan to write code over all four days, while some projects plan a shorter sprint if the organizers cannot stay for all four days.

Can you start getting prepared for the sprint ahead of time? Yes!

There are several things you can do ahead of time, that can save effort once you arrive at the sprints — and some preparations can even be made at home, before you arrive at PyCon:

  • Have your operating system updated and patched — whether Mac, Windows, or Linux. This eliminates one possible source of problems with getting software up and running.
  • Go ahead and install the version control system that will be used by the projects you are interested in. If you install both git and Mercurial on your computer, you will be ready to help with almost any project at the sprints.
  • If you might be sprinting with a project whose code is written in C, you should have the default compiler for your platform installed. This will usually be make and gcc in Linux, and the Xcode tools on the Mac. You will have the chance to learn more about these at the Intro to Sprints session.
  • Browse ahead of time our list of projects that will be sprinting. If there are projects that especially interest you, try checking out their latest source code to your laptop and attempt to build the project and run its tests successfully. If you run into snags, see whether the project has a project mailing list or IRC channel where you could ask questions. Or you could wait and ask for help from the project leads in person once you arrive on-site at the sprint itself, where they can iterate more quickly on the error you are facing. I took this approach myself in 2013 while attending my first-ever PyCon development sprint! For the CPython project, you can consult https://docs.python.org/devguide/ for the steps on how to build it.
  • Not every project that will be sprinting is listed yet on our projects page. The official list of sprinting projects is presented in a quick presentation a few minutes after the final PyCon keynote ends and the conference ends. Each project lead will come to the stage and introduce their project in around 30–45 seconds. Here is the long queue of project leads waiting to present at 2013:

The long queue of sprinters

  • If you are yourself a project lead or developer for an open source project, feel free to add your project to our list if you are prepared to come lead a sprint. Be sure that you are ready with a checkout of the latest source code, and a list of features and bugs on which both beginners and experienced programmers can work.

  • Remember to use the rule of two feet: if you are not enjoying a particular project, feel free to go visit all of the other rooms and tables and projects. Work on whichever projects you like. No one will feel bad if you leave one table and join another one.

We will be presenting an “Introduction to Sprints” workshop starting at 4:30pm on June 1st in the Oregon Ballroom 201–202. If there are spaces left, you can pre-register yourself for the session on EventBrite:

Intro to Sprints event sign-up page on EventBrite

Finally, remember to enjoy your time at PyCon. This is the time of the year when we all can meet, discuss new ideas, showcase our work, and make new friends.

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Childcare spots are still available for PyCon 2016!

A venue as exciting as the city of Montréal in 2014–15 and now Portland in 2016–17 often tempts attendees with children to want to go ahead and bring them along, turning what could have been simply a business trip into a full family vacation to a new city. Other attendees are in circumstances that make it impossible to leave their children at home, threatening to rule out PyCon entirely unless children can be accommodated.

For both of these reasons, PyCon is proud to be offering childcare again for Portland 2016 — our third year of being able to offer this service to parents who are attending the conference.

And we are especially grateful to our 2016 Childcare Sponsors: Facebook and Instagram!

Without the generous support of these Childcare Sponsors, parents would be facing a bill four times greater than the $50 per child per day that we are able to offer this year. By providing this generous subsidy, Facebook and Instagram are working to make the conference possible for parents who might otherwise have been not able to consider it.

Visit our Childcare page to learn more:

https://us.pycon.org/2016/childcare/

Several spots are still open — so if childcare could make your PyCon visit even better, there is still time to sign up!