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Talks at PyCon that Teach How to Be Better Programmers

I've been looking over the mix of talk proposals we have so far for PyCon 2007. We're got 17 so far, with a good number of case histories. Now case histories are good, don't get me wrong, we want Python to be successful and it is interesting to hear how it is being used. But according to the feedback forms from last year, we need more talks that actually teach you how to be better programmers, especially if we want to bring new talent into the community.

Where are the talks about how to best use select features of the language, that demonstrate how to use some of the more powerful design patterns in Python? Python 2.4 and 2.5 have added significant new capabilities to the language and we need the advance scouts to help some of us just now discovering them. Many of us do not adopt new features as soon as they appear.

Often at PyCon we have looked to people like Alex Martelli to get down and dirty with aspects of the language, but unfortunately he is unable to make it in 2007. Who else is good at explaining how and when to apply language constructs?

Not sure where to start? For brainstorming here are four talks I've not seen at recent PyCons and that I think would be well received.

How to Optimize Your Python Programs?
  • optimization - speed or memory?
  • common mistakes
    • use of repeated append on strings
    • not using PyNum when doing array operations
      • such as graphics, sound
    • close your handles, release your objects where possible
    • what slows Python down?
      • looping?
      • function calls?
    • methods to speed things up
      • pre-binding
      • push looping into C extensions
      • code in C extensions releases global lock and speeds up execution on multicores
      • shrinking your memory footprint
Key Python Technologies You Should Know
The idea of this talk is to highlight some of the cross-domain technologies that a programmer would find useful in his toolbelt as he moves among problems or job positions.
  • criteria for inclusion in talk:
    • cross-platform
    • cross-domain
    • of general use, not obscure or a niche
  • docutils, reST docstrings, READMEs, page templates, wiki markup, doctests)
  • interfaces/adapters
  • eggs
  • unit test frameworks
  • DB-API?
Taking Your Programming Environment to a New Level
What do skilled Python programmers keep around them that makes them better programmers?
  • pymacs, pyvim
  • pylint
  • ipython and other command shells
  • brief walk-thru of GUI IDEs
  • keeping docs at your fingertips
  • books to keep at your side
(this talk could be run as a panel among experts)

What the Heck Does "Pythonic Programming Style" Mean Anyway?
The term is often tossed at someone on the list, but what the heck
are they talking about? How can a newbie learn the style?
  • common idioms you see in source code
  • attributes versus getters/setters
  • package dir layouts
    • import all in __init__?
    • fully name-qualify all imports?

I've included links to the wiki pages holding the outlines in hopes that people will suggest additional topics to cover.

To give a talk, visit the conference proposals page.

Jeff Rush
PyCon 2007 Co-Chair

Comments

Arthur said…
A how-to presentation on ctypes would be swell. Ctypes is new in the standard distor, seems powerful and important but is accessible only to the initiated. Assume a competent Python programmer with little C experience, and get them started.
Would be nice.

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