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Game Programming Clinic and Online Gaming at PyCon

At PyCon this year we're going to have a multi-day game programming clinic and challenge. This is a first-time event and an experiment to find those in the Python community who enjoy playing and creating games. Python has several powerful modules for the creation of games among which are PyGame and PyOpenGL.

On Friday evening, Phil Hassey will give an introduction to his game Galcon, an awesome high-paced multi-player galactic action-strategy game. You send swarms of ships from planet to planet to take over the galaxy. Phil will be handing out free limited-time licenses to those present. He will also be glad to talk about the development of Galcon using PyGame.

After the Friday PSF Members meeting lets out around 8:40pm, Richard Jones will give his 30-60 minute introduction to the PyGame framework so you too can get started writing games.

On Saturday evening, Lucio Torre and Alejandro J. Cura, who have come from Argentina to give the talk "pyweek: making games in 7 days" Friday afternoon, will help people develop their games in the clinic room with mini-talks on various game technologies.

On Sunday evening Lucio and Alejandro will around to help with further development issues, and Richard Jones will be back to present more about PyGame and help reach a group concensus on what to work on during the GameSprint. Richard also runs PyWeek, a bi-annual python game programming challenge online.

Phil will also be back helping people get into playing Galcon and everyone can begin multiplayer challenges against those who show up.

And then during the four days of sprinting, the group will compete to produce a working game meeting agreed upon requirements and then decide who has best achieved those.

This overall gaming track is informal, with people coming and going, and others are welcome to get involved in giving mini-talks or showing off their creations.

Specific activities, rooms and times can be found on the wiki pages for the birds-of-a-feather schedule, collecting game clinic ideas and for the game sprint.

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Want to get a head start? Follow the online lectures about PyGame and, to get your laptop ready to rumble, check out the installation and testing instructions.

By the way, other birds-of-a-feather groups are encouraged to work up their schedules as well and update the PyCon BoF schedule page.

See you later this week,

Jeff Rush
Co-Chair PyCon 2007

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