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Call for Project Participation in Development Sprints at PyCon 2008

Python-related projects: join the PyCon Development Sprints!

The development sprints are a key part of PyCon, a chance for the contributors to open-source projects to get together face-to-face for up to four days of intensive learning and development. Newbies sit at the same table as the gurus, go out for lunch and dinner together, and have a great time while advancing their project. At PyCon 2007 in Dallas we must have had 20 projects sprinting.

If your project would like to sprint at PyCon, now is the time to let us know. We need to collect the info and publish it, so participants will have time to make plans. We need to get the word out early, because no matter what we do during the conference, most people who haven't already decided to sprint won't be able to stay, because they have a planes to catch and no hotel rooms.

In the past, many people have been reluctant to commit to sprinting. Some may not know what sprinting is all about; others may think that they're not "qualified" to sprint. We want to change that perception.

* We want to help promote your sprint. The PyCon website, the PyCon blog, the PyCon podcast, and press releases will be there for you.

* PyCon attendees will be asked to commit to sprints on the registration form, which will include a list of sprints with links to further info.

* We will be featuring a "How To Sprint" session on Sunday afternoon, followed by sprint-related tutorials, all for free. This is a great opportunity to introduce your project to prospective contributors. We'll have more details about this later.

* Some sponsors are helping out with the sprints as well.

There's also cost. Although the sprinting itself is free, sprints have associated time and hotel costs. We can't do anything about the time cost, but we may have some complimentary rooms and funding available for sprinters. We will have more to say on financial aid later.

Those who want to propose a sprint should send the following information to pycon-organizers@python.org:

* Project/sprint name
* Project URL
* The name and contact info (email & telephone) for the sprint leader(s) and other contributors who will attend the sprint
* Instructions for accessing the project's code repository and documentation (or a URL)
* Pointers to new contributor information (setup, etc.)
* Any special requirements (projector? whiteboard? flux capacitor?)

We will add this information to the PyCon website and set up a wiki page for you (or we can link to yours). Projects need a list of goals (bugs to fix, features to add, docs to write, etc.), especially some goals for beginners, to attract new sprinters. The more detail you put there, the more prepared your sprinters will be, and the more results you'll get.

In 2007 there were sprints for Python, Jython, Zope, Django, TurboGears, Python in Education, SchoolTool, Trac, Docutils, the Python Job Board, PyCon-Tech, and other projects. We would like to see all these and more!

The sprints will run from Monday, March 17 through Thursday, March 20, 2008. You can find more details here:
http://us.pycon.org/2008/sprints/.

Thank you very much, and happy coding!

Comments

Doug Napoleone said…
CORRECTION:

Attendees will NOT be presented with sprints on the registration form. Attendees are NOT required to register for sprints.

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