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We're Ready for Your Proposals

Maybe you’ve been to PyCon before, maybe you’ve seen the videos online, maybe you’ve even seen our Call for Proposals for PyCon 2012. Maybe you asked your boss for time off March 7-15, 2012 to join us in Santa Clara, CA for PyCon. Well, maybe you’re not that far along, but maybe you’re thinking about it. Here’s one thing you should think about: You should propose a talk. Yes, I said it. You, the reader, should propose a talk at PyCon.

You’re probably thinking, “I don’t even know this guy and he thinks I should propose a talk?” Nope, I probably don’t know you, but you probably know something I don’t know. You’ve probably had experiences I haven’t had. You probably work on some really cool stuff that I don’t work on. You’re what PyCon needs. We’re looking for members of the Python community to talk about what they’re up to. New or old, beginner or expert, the conference starts and ends with you.

Each year, PyCon’s schedule is not only made up of a wide array of topics, but of approaches. There’s always plenty of “how” talks: how to use a library, how to write documentation, how to bring Python into your organization. We get a number of “why” talks: why you should test, why you should look at alternative implementations, why you should look at Python 3. There’s always a few “status” talks: status of Unicode in Python 3, status of packaging, status of various projects. There’s also panels, investigations, crazy demos, and a lot more. You certainly know some how’s and why’s, might have some status to show, could chip in to a panel, share your best practices on a topic, or present a deep dive on a problem. You could also do something totally new. In fact, we’d love that. We need that.

If you’re short on topic ideas, the #pycontalksiwant tag on Twitter is starting to fill up with some good ones. @nedbat wants to know what Python could learn from other languages. @doughellmann wants to know some devops tips and tricks. @BigJasonWebb wants to know how to get an organization to use Python 3, and @johnmarshall is wondering how people are upgrading to Python 3.

Take a look and see if you can contribute to any of those topics -- the talks aren’t going to write themselves. Any contribution here helps, especially in adding the topics you’d be interested in seeing, since we haven’t yet figured out mind reading.

If you’re ready to submit a talk, check out http://us.pycon.org/2012/speaker/ and our Call for Proposals. You’ve got 53 days to submit your proposals, and you can follow along here or on twitter for regular updates. We have a lot of surprises up our sleeves!

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