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Need Tutorial Ideas?

To follow-up with last week's post on talk ideas, we've done some digging into what topics would make for good tutorials. The resulting lists contain a lot of the same topics as talk ideas, with a few interesting requests, including "anything from [plenary speaker] David Beazley".

We're now 15 days away from the October 12 deadline for proposals, and we don't want to start the review process without your proposal. PyCon's success depends on you, the community, to keep cranking out the great presentations you're known for. Tutorials are an especially great time at PyCon, as they're an excellent chance to expand your skill set thanks to the great educators of the community presenting their three-hour sessions at a bargain price.

If you're interested in flexing your teaching skills but need help narrowing down a topic, we recently polled the Python community to find out what they want. When asked, "Are there any particular subjects that you would like to see more tutorials about?", we found the following.

Desktop Software

  • Dabo framework
  • OS integration
  • Packaging and deployment
  • Python on Windows
  • PyQt, PyGTK, wxPython and other GUI frameworks

Language Integration

  • Advanced ctypes usage
  • Wrapping C, C++, and Fortran libraries
  • Python's C-API
  • Cython and Shedskin
  • Writing C/C++ for Python programmers

Performance

  • Profiling and analysis
  • Designing for speed
  • Writing optimal Python code

Web

  • Frameworks: Django, web2py, Pylons, Pyramid
  • Templating
  • WSGI - past, present, and future
  • Servers: Tornado, Hookbox

Concurrency and Parallelism

  • Celery, RabbitMQ, AMQP
  • multiprocessing and multithreading
  • gevent, eventlet, Twisted
  • microthreads, coroutines, generators
  • greenlet, Stackless

Entertainment

  • pygame, nodebox
  • 2D and 3D graphics programming

Software Engineering

  • All forms of testing
  • Library design
  • Building applications from the ground up

Python Implementations

  • PyPy, IronPython, Jython
  • Writing a Python compiler

Others

  • Natural Language Processing
  • Machine Learning
  • Devops tools
  • Robotics
  • Processing large amounts of data
  • SimPy

As with our previous post, note that this information isn't the canonical list of everything everyone wants to see, and any lack of a given topic just means our small sampling didn't request it. As with last time, we noticed some glaring omissions, including no requests for "cloud computing", a generally hot topic at PyCon. For comparison, last year's tutorial schedule included two cloud tutorials. Hopefully the list helps as a brainstorm session if you're looking for that last push to fill out a proposal.

You have 15 days to get your proposals in at http://us.pycon.org/2012/speaker/, and remember, you can still clean up and edit your proposals after the October 12, 2011 due date. In fact, we expect that most proposals will see changes as the review process begins. PyCon's program committee is tasked with putting together the best tutorial, talk, and poster lineups available, so they'll act as another set of eyes to help you out. From assisting in organization to helping flesh out an idea, the program committee is there to provide constructive criticism and make sure you get the most out of your proposal. Together, we can make PyCon 2012 a success for all.

Comments

Greg Wilson said…
How about a tutorial on how to teach Python, esp. to people who don't think of themselves as programmers?

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