Skip to main content

What to do on Sunday at PyCon?

Sunday is usually a wind down day at most conferences, but not PyCon. We kick things into high gear! We may only have two sessions of talks, but that is because we have filled the rest of the time with pure awesome.

Sponsor Raffle


Our sponsors are very generous and have provided a large amount of items to be given away to attendees. We have streamlined the processes this year, but you will not want to miss the morning announcements for an extra special giveaway!


Guido van Rossum


The creator of the Python programming language will be giving the final Keynote; one you will not want to miss. What better way to start the final day of the conference than hearing from the man who started it all? Guido is even asking the community what they'd like to him to talk about at his Google+ page.


Jobs Fair

Our sponsors are hiring. In fact they are having a very hard time finding talented Python programmers. Luckily PyCon is chock full of exceptionally talented Python programmers. As such we are holding what we hope will be come an annual Jobs Fare. You can already see many of the open positions our sponsors are hoping to fill on the PyCon website. For those of you looking to you share your contact information with potential employers, PyCon has three ways to help. Your PyCon badge has an optional backside with a barcode containing your name and e-mail address which potential employers can scan. Your PyCon badge also comes with a few tear off business cards with this information printed on it.Finally our sponsor MOO is providing 50 free business cards to all PyCon attendees, but you need to act fast, as the deadline is Monday Febuary 27th. You can pick up your cards at PyCon in the Expo room.

NOTE: PyCon and the PSF take your privacy seriously, and we do not share any of your information with sponsors or anyone else.




Poster Session

This year we have 49 incredible poster presentations! Poster presentations are all given at the same time. Posters are put on display, and during the presentation period, the authors will give a two to five minute presentation of their poster along with a Q&A session. This repeats for the full hour and a half session. This is very hands on with no barrier between the presenters and the attendees. Attendees are encouraged to ask questions and enter into group dialogs over the poster. Even with an hour and a half, it will be very hard to see all of the posters, so please plan ahead.


Sprints

PyCon Development Sprints are four days of intensive learning and development on an open source project of your choice, in a team environment. It's a time to come together with colleagues, old and new, to share what you've learned and apply it to an open source project. Sprints are open to the public. You need not be a PyCon attendee to take part. PyCon supplies the space, the power, white boards, and the internet connection. You provide the laptop, and the willingness and desire to work on a project. You need not be a programmer to help out. All projects need help with documentation, QA, design, and graphics help. Even just proof reading, and explaining what parts you find confusing is invaluable.

Sunday at 4:30 PM, immediately after the final Lightning Talk session, is the Sprints Introduction. This short 30 minute event is where the sprint processes is described, and the initial sprint groups are formed. Sprint leaders give a brief introduction to the audience on their project. After the introductions are given, attendees decide which project they would like to start with, and gather with others on that project. This is not a binding contract. Attendees are free to switch between projects at any time.

If hotel reservations are any indication, and they are, this is going to be the largest single location sprint on record.

Once the introduction is over, the teams will move over the conference will migrate to the adjoined Hyatt hotel where the sprints will be held. Projects will self organize with the help of the Sprint Head into rooms. As part of this we will need help from the sprinters with this migration from the talk conference, to the sprint conference. Which brings us to:


Conference Transition Volunteer Help

With the main conference over, we are going to need help tearing down and packing up the conference at the Santa Clara convention center and moving into the adjoined Hyatt hotel conference space for the Sprints. This will mainly consist of moving the power strips and any PyCon owned networking and moving it to the new conference space. There will be plenty of PyCon heads helping with this processes, but in order to get ti done in a timely and orderly manner, we are going to need quite a bit of help. Please consider volunteering with this effort in order to make this the greatest Sprint session ever.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hatchery Program Returns for 2019

PyCon is known around the world as the Python community’s premier event, attracting people from 39 countries. Outside of the main track of talks, PyCon is home to a growing number of events such as Young Coders, the Education Summit, Language Summit, Poster Session, and most recently the PyCon Charlas. The conference strives to be globally representative by promoting diversity and inclusion through these additional events and outreach programs. Our community works to approach these goals year on year. While we regularly receive requests to add events to PyCon, we have not had an established process for accepting and evaluating the community’s suggestions. By introducing the PyCon Hatchery Program in 2018, we took an initial step to introduce a long term process for evolving PyCon. What is our goal?We want to support our community and enable them to add events to PyCon that are important to our community. The long-term goals of this program are to support and grow sustainable programs th…

Pycon 2019 Call for Proposals is Open!

The time is upon us again! PyCon 2019’s Call for Proposals has officially opened for talks, tutorials, posters, education summit presentations, as well as the hatchery program PyCon Charlas. PyCon is made by you, so we need you to share what you’re working on, how you’re working on it, what you’ve learned, what you’re learning, and so much more.

Please make note of important deadlines for submissions:
Tutorial proposals are due November 26, 2018.Talk, Charlas, Poster, and Education Summit proposals are due January 3, 2019.
Who should write a proposal? Everyone! If you’re reading this post, you should write a proposal. PyCon is about uniting and building the Python community, and we won’t advance as an open community if we’re not open with each other about what we’ve learned throughout our time in it. It isn’t about being the smartest one in the room, so we don’t just pick all of the expert talks. It’s about helping everyone move together. “A rising tide lifts all boats,” if you will.

We…

PyCon 2018 Code of Conduct Transparency Report

The PyCon Code of Conduct sets standards for how our community interacts with others during the conference. For 2018 the Code of Conduct underwent an extensive overhaul, our procedures for reporting and responding to incidents were improved, and our on-site methods were improved. You can read more about the updates for 2018 here. Cumulatively these changes were meant to improve the safety, welcoming nature, and overall inclusivity of PyCon. Based on initial responses, feedback, and incidents reported this year we feel that we made progress on those goals. A Code of Conduct without appropriate reporting and response procedures is difficult to enforce transparently, and furthermore a lack of transparency in the outcomes of Code of Conduct incidents leaves the community without knowledge of how or if the organizers worked to resolve incidents. With that in mind, we have prepared the following to help the community understand what kind of incidents we received reports about and how the PyCon…