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PyCon US 2013: Highlighting net-ng, Web Cube, Python Academy, and SendGrid

At PyCon, we love our sponsors, and we hope you do as well. They help us keep the conference affordable, allow us to do the big things we have planned, and they’re a source of jobs for you - the community. Check out what a few of them are up to.

net-ng

Net-ng came to the Python world over 10 years ago, building most of their products using the Nagare framework they created in 2008. They use Python to enable their creation of highly scalable, robust applications, and offer Python training to business in France.

When asked about the importance of Python at net-ng, Jean-Luc Carre said, “Python is important for us because it provides multiple benefits such as a great community, strong performances and maintainability.” Jean-Luc went on to praise Python’s ease of use for the beginners to his team.

Their history with PyCon goes back to 2001 in Long Beach, CA, when PyCon was but a fraction of what it is today. Net-ng’s excitement over Python’s growth in popularity not only in business and in conferences extends to their interaction with fellow attendees. “Whenever our team attends PyCon, it's a great opportunity to share ideas, meet fantastic people, and learn new technologies, in a great atmosphere,” says Jean-Luc.

Net-ng proudly supports not only PyCon US, but also EuroPython and PyCon FR.

Web Cube

“We use Python for everything!” says Janet Noyes of Web Cube. Established in 2003, Web Cube provides a Django-based e-commerce and CMS platform, as well as other services -- with Python at the heart of it all. “Without Python, we would be years behind where we are now in terms of the maturity of our product,” says Janet. Web Cube makes use of Python for quick prototyping, allowing them to take products to the market quicker than the competition.

PyCon allows the Web Cube staff to continue to learn and hone their craft, according to Janet. “Python is changing, and this is a way for us to make sure that we are still up to speed,” she said when asked why attending the conference matters to them. They enjoy the interaction with attendees and speakers to ensure their practices are up-to-date, and to keep them at the leading edge of the Python world.

Janet closed by saying, “In addition, we are hiring Python developers, and we know that the best Python developers in the world will be here with us.”

Python Academy

When we asked Mike Müller why Python was important to Python Academy, the answer came easily. “Without Python, our company would not exist as it does today,” he simply said. Mike’s business is in teaching Python, both in open courses and on-site, so it’s pretty obvious what he’s using Python for.

While the majority of Python Academy’s courses take place in Germany, 2012 brought them to Italy, Poland, and Belgium. 2013 will bring them across the pond to collaborate on a course with fellow PyCon sponsor, David Beazley.

Along with teaching the language, Python Academy offers more focused training, with materials for science and engineering, high performance, databases, and more. They’re able to tailor each course to a client’s needs, pulling from a wide range of experience among their trainers, including many years as consultants and pair programming coaches.

Python Academy supports the Python community in every way possible. They’ve been PyCon sponsors for years, and they also support EuroPython, EuroSciPy, PyCon DE, and PyCon PL. Along with conference sponsorship, all of the trainers at the academy contribute open source code and work with user groups, even getting into conference organization!

SendGrid

At SendGrid, Python is at the core of their infrastructure. 120 million emails flow through their cloud-based email service each day, thanks in part to the Python ecosystem. Their developers enjoy the rich and robust projects the community has to offer, giving them a wide variety of tools to make their lives easier. Ultimately, Python helps them deliver outstanding value to their customers.

Supporting PyCon gets SendGrid’s name out to the community -- the one they looked to when they doubled in size in 2012. PyCon’s Job Fair is a great place to find your next employees or your next job, so be sure to check it out. SendGrid will be there. Will you?

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