Skip to main content

The new, simpler Tutorial proposal form closes tomorrow!

This is the time of year when the upcoming PyCon really starts to feel closer, with the close of our earliest CFP (Call for Proposals) tomorrow on November 30. This is the first of several milestones for the conference that start arriving more and more frequently through the late autumn and winter. Each milestone ratchets PyCon one step closer to its arrival.

Our earliest CFP is for our Tutorials, which closes tomorrow — at the end of the day on November 30 anywhere on Earth. So if it is still November 30 in your time zone, then the CFP will not yet be closed!

IMG_0794.jpg

What are the main features of Tutorials?

  • Tutorials are 3-hour-long courses that pack the first two days of the PyCon conference schedule.
  • Students register ahead of time and pay separately for each 3-hour tutorial they attend.
  • We end the Tutorials CFP a full month earlier than for Talks and Posters, so the tutorials committee has extra time to fully vet each proposal and to generate a solid line-up of valuable topics that will repay the students’ investment to attend them.
  • In return for providing this value to the conference, we compensate each instructor. The amount can vary each year depending on the conference budget, but in 2016 we were able to reward them each with $1,500 for the instruction they provided our attendees.
  • You can learn more at our Proposing a Tutorial page, which includes links to long lists of topics in case you need inspiration!

If you proposed a tutorial last year, you will be happy to learn that we have streamlined the form to only four fields beyond the title itself:

  1. The Description is the public advertisement for your Tutorial and will be visible on the PyCon web site — replacing what used to be separate Description and Abstract fields. The other fields below are private and shared only with the committee.
  2. The Audience field lets you write a free-form description of who you think will be interested in and benefit from your tutorial. It replaces the old Audience, Category, and Perceived Value fields.
  3. The most detailed information, as before, belongs in the Outline that you write up for the committee.
  4. Finally, the Additional notes let you describe your previous experience as an instructor and mention any special setup or materials that your tutorial will require. It replaces the old fields Additional Notes, Additional Requirements, More Info, and Handout.

Hopefully the new form means that you spend less time puzzling over what the difference between a Description and an Abstract is, and more time focusing on your ideas about your course!

Does teaching at PyCon interest you? There is only one day left to submit your proposal! Head on over to the Proposing a Tutorial page and get your idea submitted before the end of the day on November 30 anywhere on Earth.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hatchery Program Returns for 2019

PyCon is known around the world as the Python community’s premier event, attracting people from 39 countries. Outside of the main track of talks, PyCon is home to a growing number of events such as Young Coders, the Education Summit, Language Summit, Poster Session, and most recently the PyCon Charlas. The conference strives to be globally representative by promoting diversity and inclusion through these additional events and outreach programs. Our community works to approach these goals year on year. While we regularly receive requests to add events to PyCon, we have not had an established process for accepting and evaluating the community’s suggestions. By introducing the PyCon Hatchery Program in 2018, we took an initial step to introduce a long term process for evolving PyCon. What is our goal?We want to support our community and enable them to add events to PyCon that are important to our community. The long-term goals of this program are to support and grow sustainable programs th…

Pycon 2019 Call for Proposals is Open!

The time is upon us again! PyCon 2019’s Call for Proposals has officially opened for talks, tutorials, posters, education summit presentations, as well as the hatchery program PyCon Charlas. PyCon is made by you, so we need you to share what you’re working on, how you’re working on it, what you’ve learned, what you’re learning, and so much more.

Please make note of important deadlines for submissions:
Tutorial proposals are due November 26, 2018.Talk, Charlas, Poster, and Education Summit proposals are due January 3, 2019.
Who should write a proposal? Everyone! If you’re reading this post, you should write a proposal. PyCon is about uniting and building the Python community, and we won’t advance as an open community if we’re not open with each other about what we’ve learned throughout our time in it. It isn’t about being the smartest one in the room, so we don’t just pick all of the expert talks. It’s about helping everyone move together. “A rising tide lifts all boats,” if you will.

We…

PyCon 2018 Code of Conduct Transparency Report

The PyCon Code of Conduct sets standards for how our community interacts with others during the conference. For 2018 the Code of Conduct underwent an extensive overhaul, our procedures for reporting and responding to incidents were improved, and our on-site methods were improved. You can read more about the updates for 2018 here. Cumulatively these changes were meant to improve the safety, welcoming nature, and overall inclusivity of PyCon. Based on initial responses, feedback, and incidents reported this year we feel that we made progress on those goals. A Code of Conduct without appropriate reporting and response procedures is difficult to enforce transparently, and furthermore a lack of transparency in the outcomes of Code of Conduct incidents leaves the community without knowledge of how or if the organizers worked to resolve incidents. With that in mind, we have prepared the following to help the community understand what kind of incidents we received reports about and how the PyCon…